50 Short Fiction Markets

50 Short Fiction Markets, I honestly didn’t think I would find that many. But you’d be surprised how many there are out there, and how many are willing to pay some decent amounts.

I was first introduced to science fiction through the short works of Ray Bradbury. The Fireman, which later was expanded from a short story to become Fahrenheit 451, was one of the first by the legend I ever read. The Illustrated Man, the Martian Chronicles, The Rocket, Bradbury knew the art form better than most. So naturally, when I started writing that’s where I started.

I would write like fire, submit, then get rejected. This cycle continued and continued until eventually I got a few sales, but very little money rolled in. However, you’d be surprised how many authors write short fiction and walk away with $1,200 or more through out the year by selling three or four stories a year.

For some- That could be a trip to Realm Makers or your favorite con. Pay for editing, cover design, or just a nice vacation.

I love the art form- And in my mind it’s worth the effort. Especially if you make a couple hundred bucks. So here are 50 Short Fiction Markets I’ve learned about.

Note: This list was first given to me by H.A. Titus: Over the past two years I’ve added to it off and on as I come across a new market. Also- please read each markets guidelines- They can change from time to time. So I hope you enjoy.

Analog: Science fiction: 2,000-7,000 for short stories; 10,000-20,000 for novelettes, and 40,000-80,000 for serials. NO REPRINTS. Pays 7-9 cents/word up to 7,500 words, $525-675 between 7,500-10,000 words, 7-7,5 cents/word for longer material, and 5 cents/word for serials.

http://www.analogsf.com/contact-us/writers-guidelines/

 

Aliterate: science fiction, fantasy, westerns, pulps, thrillers, horror and romance. Has a sci-fi/fantasy lean. 2,500 and 8,000 words pays 6 cents per word.

https://www.aliterate.org/submit/

 

Asimov’s: Science fiction up to 20,000 words. NO REPRINTS. First English Language serial rights plus non-exclusive rights. 8-10 cents/word up to 7,500 words and 8-8.5 cents/word for longer material.

http://www.asimovs.com/info/guidelines.shtml

 

Aurealis: Science fiction, fantasy, and horror between 2,000-8,000 words. NO REPRINTS. Buys First Electronic Rights and non-exclusive anthology rights. Rights revert back to the author 1 year after publication. Pays $20-$60/1,000 words.

https://aurealis.com.au/submissions/

 

Apex Magazine: Science Fiction, fantasy, and horror magazine. Up to 7,500 words. Pay $0.06 per word.

https://www.apex-magazine.com/submission-guidelines/

 

Beneath Ceaseless Skies: accepts fantasy with a strong emphasis on the literary feel of a piece. NO REPRINTS. First World Serial rights, First World Electronic rights, non-exclusive World Audio rights, and an option to purchase non-exclusive World Anthology rights, up to 180 days after publication. Pays 6 cents/word.

http://www.beneath-ceaseless-skies.com/submissions/

 

Betwixt Magazine: Speculative fiction. NO REPRINTS. 1,000-30,000 words range, but preferred length is 4-7,000. 3 cents/word up to $225. Reading periods: Oct 1–Nov 30; January 1-Feb 28; April 1-May 31; July 1-Aug 31. (Not sure if this Mag is coming back)

http://betwixtmagazine.com/submissions/

 

BuzzyMag: Science fiction and fantasy up to 10,000 words. ACCEPTS REPRINTS. 10 cents/word for first rights, 2 cents/word for non-exclusive reprint rights.

http://buzzymag.com/submissions/

 

Castlepod: fantasy. ACCEPTS REPRINTS. Audio and electronic rights, and a Creative Commons license. 0.05/0.03 cents per word.

http://podcastle.org/guidelines/

 

Canadian Science Fiction Review: science fiction between 500-3,000 words. NO REPRINTS. Buys First Serial, First Electronic, and non-exclusive audio rights, and a Creative Commons license. Pays 6 cents/word.

http://aescifi.ca/#submit

 

Cicada: A YA lit/comics magazine fascinated with lyric and strange and committed to work that speaks to teens’ truths. Flash fic to novellas; up to 9,000 words – pays up to 25 cents a word.

http://cricketmedia.com/cicada-submission-guidelines

 

Clarkesworld: Science fiction and fantasy between 1,000-8,000 words (preferred is 4,000). NO REPRINTS. First world electronic rights (text and audio), first print rights, and non-exclusive anthology rights. 10 cents/word for the first 4,000 words, 7 cents/word after.

http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/submissions/

 

Cosmic Roots and Eldritch Shores: Science fiction, fantasy, etc, 1,000 words and up though shorter works will be preferred. 6 cents/word for original fiction, 2 cents/word for reprints.

http://cosmicrootsandeldritchshores.com/submissions/

 

Crossed Genres: Science fiction and fantasy following a theme, between 1,000-6,000 words. NO REPRINTS. First World e-book and print rights as well as non-exclusive anthology and online rights. Pays  6 cents/word.

http://crossedgenres.com/submissions/magazine/

 

Compelling Science Fiction: Publishes Science Fiction between 1,000 – 10,000 words. Pays up 6 cents a word.

http://compellingsciencefiction.com/submit.html

 

Daily Science Fiction: Science fiction and fantasy up to 1,500 words. Accepts flash fiction series. NO REPRINTS. First worldwide rights and nonexclusive reprint rights with an option to be included in an anthology. 8 cents/word with additional payment if included in an anthology. http://dailysciencefiction.com/submit/story/guidelines

 

Diabolical Plots: A sci-fi/fantasy zine – 3500 words or less- 8 cents per word (more than the minimum professional rate as deemed by SFWA)

http://www.diabolicalplots.com/guidelines/

 

Deep Magic: Accepts clean fantasy and science fiction stories. Pays 8 cents a word for up to 5,000 words and 6 cents per word from 5,001 – 16,000.

http://deepmagic.co/submissions/

 

Escape Pod: science fiction. ACCEPTS REPRINTS. 2,000-6,000 words. Audio and electronic rights and a Creative Commons license. 0.05/0.03 cents per word.

http://escapepod.org/guidelines/

 

Everyday Fiction: All genres up to 1,000 words. NO REPRINTS. First rights with an option for First Anthology rights. $3/story with an additional dollar if chosen for an anthology. http://www.everydayfiction.com/submit-story/

 

Fantastic Stories of the Imagination: fantasy and sci-fi up to 3,000 words. REPRINTS ACCEPTED. Pays 15 cents/word for original stories, and 1 cent/word for reprints, min of $25 and max of $100. Licenses rights for web, print, and anthologies.

http://www.fantasticstoriesoftheimagination.com/submission-guidelines/

 

Fantasy and Science Fiction: Fantasy and science fiction up to 25,000 words. NO REPRINTS. First North American and foreign serial rights, and an option for anthology rights. 7-12 cents per word. http://www.sfsite.com/fsf/glines.htm

 

Far Fetched Fables: pays $50 flat rate per story. Fantasy stories.

http://farfetchedfables.com/submissions/

 

Fireside Fiction: We accept flash fiction of up to 1,000 words, and short stories from 1,000 to 4,000 words. pays 12.5 cents per word

https://firesidefiction.com/about/#submissions-guidelines

 

Farstrider Magazine: accepts fantasy with a sense of humor. NO REPRINTS. 500-4,000 words. 3 cents/word. First electronic rights as well as inclusive in an annual anthology. http://www.farstridermag.com/submit.html

 

Flash Fiction Online: Any genre between 500-1,000 words. REPRINTS ACCEPTED. $60/story, 2 cents/word for reprints. First electronic rights, including audio. Non-exlcusive one-time anthology rights.

http://flashfictiononline.com/main/submission-guidelines/

 

Flame Tree Publishing anthology calls: Flame Tree Publishing anthology calls- only accept short stories for specific anthologies which are announced on our website, our blog and through Facebook, Twitter and Google.

https://www.flametreepublishing.com/submissions.html

 

Gamut: An online magazine of neo-noir, spec fic with a literary bent. word range is about 500-5,000 with the sweet spot being 3,000. Pays 10 cents per word.

http://www.gamut.online/about

 

GrimDark: GrimDark fantasy and science fiction between 1,500-4,000 words. Serials are accepted but must be completed before acceptance. NO REPRINTS. First World rights, reverted 1 year after the contract is signed, after which they maintain non-exclusive distribution rights. Pays 6 cents/word. http://www.grimdarkmagazine.com/submission-guidelines-for-grimdark-magazine/

 

Havok: Science fiction and fantasy between 500-1,000 words. NO REPRINTS. First rights for six months and reprint rights for perpetuity. Small stipend for payment depending on length of story. Issues are themed.

http://splickety.com/submission-guidelines/

 

Heroic Fantasy Quarterly: epic/sword and sorcery fantasy up to 10,000 words, though willing to serialize a max of 50,000 over four issues. NO REPRINTS. First World English electronic rights, exclusive electronic rights for 90 days, archival rights for 12 months, and excerpt rights. Submission periods are: March, June, September, December. Pays $100 for stories.

http://www.heroicfantasyquarterly.com/?page_id=39

 

Inscription Magazine: speculative fiction for teenagers 500-9,000 words in length. 6 cents/word. First worldwide rights and exclsuive reprint rights. ACCEPTS REPRINTS. http://www.inscriptionmagazine.com/submissions/

 

Intergalactic Medicine Show: Science fiction and fantasy of any length. ACCEPTS REPRINTS if obscure. All rights exclusive for one year, nonexclusive rights in perpetuity, as well as non-exclusive print and audio rights for anthologies. Pays 6 cents/word, with advances and royalties if included in an anthology. http://www.intergalacticmedicineshow.com/cgi-bin/mag.cgi?do=content&article=submissions

 

Kasma Magazine: speculative fiction. 1,000-5,000 words in length, though consider longer stories (and shorter in very rare cases).2 cents/word. REPRINTS ACCEPTED. Non-exclusive digital rights.

http://kasmamagazine.com/submit.cfm

 

Lamplight Magazine: A literary magazine of dark fiction, both short stories and flash fiction. Accepts originals and reprints up to 7,000 words and pays 3 cents per word or $150 max.

http://lamplightmagazine.com/submissions/

 

Lightspeed: science fiction and fantasy between 1,500-7,500 words, stories under 5,000 preferred. ACCEPTS REPRINTS, but only if not online in any form. Pays 8 cents/word for first rights, 2 cents/word for reprints.

http://www.lightspeedmagazine.com/about/guidelines//

 

Liminal Stories: An online literary magazine publishing the beautiful, heartbreaking and strange. Will consider up to 10,000 words, and pays 6 cents a word.

http://liminalstoriesmag.com/submissions/

 

Metaphorosis Magazine: science fiction and fantasy. 1,000-6,000 words is the sweet spot. NO REPRINTS. 1 cent/word.

http://magazine.metaphorosis.com/guidelines/

 

Mothership Zeta: speculative fiction stories, emphasis on fun/funny stories. Flash fiction length to 6,000 words, though there will be only one flash fiction story per issue. payment is 6 cents/word. NO REPRINTS (reprints only from Podcastle, Escapepod, and Pseudopod).

http://mothershipzeta.org/submission-guidelines/

 

New Myths: all speculative fiction exept graphic horror up to 10,000 words. NO REPRINTS. First publication rights. $50/story. Reading periods: June 1-July 31st; January 1-Feb 28th.

https://sites.google.com/a/newmyths.com/nmwebsite/submissions

 

Nightmare: a horror and dark fantasy magazine edited by John Joseph Adams. We are open to stories of 1500-7500 words. Stories of 5000 words or less are preferred. Pays 6 cents per word.

https://johnjosephadams.moksha.io/publication/nightmare/guidelines

 

Penumbra: Science fiction and fantasy of 3,500 words or less. NO REPRINTS. Pays 5 cents/word. Has issue themes—check website for open themes.

http://www.penumbramag.com/up

 

Shimmer: science fiction and fantasy, but more drawn to things like contemporary fantasy, up to 7,500 words, with 4,000 being preferred. NO REPRINTS. First Print and Electronic Rights, with rights reverting back to the author after 4 months, though rights to sell back issues of the magazine/have the story online remain. 5 cents/word. http://www.shimmerzine.com/guidelines/fiction-guidelines/

 

StarShipSofa: Science Fiction. From soft, social science fiction to weird pulpy stuff to vigorous hard SF and YA. Pays $50 flat rate per story

http://www.starshipsofa.com/submissions/

 

Strange Horizons: Science fiction and fantasy under 9,000 words, under 5,000 preferred. NO REPRINTS. Buys First English rights, including audio rights. Pays 8 cents/word. http://www.strangehorizons.com/guidelines/fiction.php

 

Strange Constellations: speculative fiction between 3,000-7,500 words. Non-execlusive electronic and anthology rights, distributed under a Creative Commons license. REPRINTS ACCEPTED. Flat rate of $30. Reading periods: July 1-Aug 31; Jan 1-Feb 28th.

http://www.strangeconstellations.com/?page_id=8

 

Superversivepress: Has open calls for anthology shorts- Check their blog.

http://www.superversivepress.com/submissions/

 

Tor.com: accepts all science fiction and fantasy under 17,500 words—under 12,000 preferred. NO REPRINTS. First electronic, translation, audio, and anthology rights, exclusive for one year, non-exclusive after that. 25 cents/word for the first 5,000 words, 15 cents/word for the next 5,000, and 10 cents/word after that. Additional royalties if chosen for an anthology.

(Very Challenging to get into)

http://www.tor.com/page/submissions-guidelines#Fiction%20Submission%20Guidelines

 

Uncanny Magazine: Science fiction and fantasy between 750-6,000 words. NO UNSOLICITED REPRINTS. First rights including first audio rights. 8 cents/word. Responds within 30 days. http://uncannymagazine.com/submissions/

 

Universe Annex: A section of the Grantville Gazette that publishes general science fiction and fantasy short stories. prefer stories under 15,000 words, with a strong preference for under 10,000 words. Pays 6 cents per word.

http://grantvillegazette.com/wp/universe-annex-submissions/

 

Theological science fiction recommendations?

Following the discussion on Redit today concerning Theological Science Fiction Recommendations. Amazing how so many people don’t know of the great authors out there who may explore this topic. Anyway – The link is below for anyone interested.

 

Theological science fiction recommendations? from printSF

Good Stories

I like quick addictive reads. They are fun, exciting, and enjoyable. Some people read to get a deeper meaning out of life, to learn a deep truth- I read for enjoyment.

There are different styles of readers, so whichever you are is fine. However, on both sides, I have found that Dean Koontz story structure method is a formula they all share.

From his out of print How to Write Best Selling Fiction (Writer’s Digest Books), © 1981. I first learned of this on Jerry B Jenkins Blog. Below is how Jenkins summarized it.

  1. Plunge your main character (lead/hero/heroine) into terrible trouble as soon as possible.

The definition of “terrible trouble” differs depending on your genre. For a thriller, it may mean your hero is hanging by his fingernails from a railroad trestle. For a cozy romance, it may mean your heroine must choose between two seemingly perfect suitors, each of whom harbors a dark secret.

2. Everything your character does to get out of the trouble makes it only worse.

The complications must be logical and grow increasingly bad until…

3. The lead’s predicament appears entirely hopeless.

4. Finally, because of what all that conflict has taught the character from the beginning, your lead rises to the occasion and battles out of the trouble, meets the challenge, accomplishes the quest, or completes the journey.

Confessing Your Monsters

Have you ever confronted the monster you don’t want to face…?

I have- I’ve fought so many. From failing out of high school to getting into college- to climbing the corporate ladder- Life has presented challenges. But the biggest challenge – The biggest monster- Is the one that whispers lies in my ear telling me I’m not good enough- I should just quit.

That’s my biggest weakness: quitting before I even start. I have so many first chapters of books that I started- Only to sit them to the side and say “That’s not going to be any good.”

For someone who has accomplished much- I struggle with confidence. I’m afraid to fail- And that fear paralyzes me to the point that I fail because I refuse to begin.

What monsters do you face, and do you have a plan to confront them…?